Since the start of my adulthood I have made it a habit to publicly share my yearly goals for the purpose of hijacking my personal commitment and my sense of accountability. 2018 is a special one as it was the first year that I decided not to share my yearly goals: I wanted to test if I can still commit to them even without being too loud. But I guess I’m not that resolute: I discovered that passivity crept up, reactivity became my daily habit, and now I even have a hard time recalling what my 2018 goals were.

Going back to my yearly habits, here are my 2019 goals that I will commit myself to. This year I will only have two, namely:

I will commit atleast 30 hours, 40 at most, every week towards the development of my vision, a 1st world Philippines.

Mainly this will be work directed at Progressia — we are at a stage where growth is evident, ideas are overflowing, and hard work is demanded. Even though Progressia works on a trust-based system, and it works amazingly, I’m dying to see what the effects of having a full-time worker are.

Apart from work items from our backlog, this particular goal may also include things like reading books, studying, networking, etc, as these are things that are important for the long haul.

I have counted the costs. Given that I have been entrusted increasing responsibilties in my dayjob and I have aplenty of passions and things that I want to do, this goal will require me dedication and extra consciousness of my resources, working myself to 70+ hours a week, yet capping myself to the 40 hour ceiling to leave me room for my hobbies and relationships. I’ll also make use of time tracking tools to measure my performance. I’ll also permit myself to offset hours to allow room for flexibility.

And that leaves me to my last goal:

I will aim to delight myself in the Lord daily.

A weird goal this may be (I see no quantitative nor qualitative measurement that I can measure myself against) but this is something that I feel I need to work on: Something that has been running in my mind for weeks if not months.

I will aim to delight myself in the Lord on a daily basis: To enjoy Him to the fullest.

And then maybe He will grant me the desires that He designed my heart for.

And from there everything else.


There it is. These are the two goals that I am setting my eyes on for 2019.
How about you? What are the things that you want to see in 2019? Do you mind sharing your goals for next year?

The 21 Common Sense Business Development Truths are points of business truths coined from the book “Financial Times Guides: Business Development – How to Win Profitable Customers and Clients” by Ian Cooper.

These down-to-earth truths, as Ian has coined, offer much wisdom on how to develop your business, whether you’re just planning to start out or you’re already running in traction.

The 21 truths in it’s entirety are titled as follows:

  1. Focus your efforts on turning your enquiries into business and not just on generating leads.
  2. Exceed customer or client expectations.
  3. Speak to potential customers or clients … and speak to them nicely.
  4. Be open for business.
  5. Don’t let your admin get in the way.
  6. There’s no job more important than helping customers or clients part with their cash!
  7. Don’t let technology get in the way.
  8. Quality and word-of-mouth count for everything.
  9. Actively strive for consistency.
  10. Recruitment is part of business development.
  11. Keep in touch with your existing and past customer and clients.
  12. Master social online media.
  13. Test your ideas, concepts, and prices.
  14. Plan, but keep things simple.
  15. Take complaints seriously,.
  16. Make your customer or client environment appropriate.
  17. Train your people to spot opportunities.
  18. Get out of your office or premises and mix and mingle.
  19. Find a niche and specialise.
  20. Model what works best.
  21. Be squeaky clean – you need to be trusted.

 

Conclusion:

These truths pack a lot of punch. Without getting into the nitty gritty of things (I advise to read the book for details), I will summarize them into five points:

  1. Customers first. Your business exist for your customers. As much as possible, exceed their expectations. Ask their feedback. Take their complaints seriously. Talk to them and build your relationship. Make their life better and easier.
  2. Goals over processes. It is harmful to get short-sighted by focusing on the processes and procedures without thinking long-term and asking the following questions: What is our business here for? What do we value? What are our goals?
  3. Test your ideas, concepts, and prices. “Business is not, as some think, about taking wild risks. It is about making sensible and sound judgments based on information that is usually available. Test as much as you can, so you have as much information as possible. In this way any risks you take are calculated ones, which then ‘stack the odds’ in your favour.”
  4. Model what works, but find a niche and specialize! “If something has been consistently successful in the past, there is a reason for it.” At the same time, it is being different that makes businesses stand out.
  5. Build trust. I’ve built Progressia with zero financial capital, instead I built it all just on the economy of trust. Be clean. Have strong values. Be honest. Be a person of utmost integrity. In the smallest of things, realize that it’s an opportunity to practice your character. And then you will attract people who will want to help you succeed and do business with you.

 

 

Reference: http://wpc.475d.edgecastcdn.net/00475D/uk/Email/FT_Guide_to_buisiness_Viking.pdf