Since the start of my adulthood I have made it a habit to publicly share my yearly goals for the purpose of hijacking my personal commitment and my sense of accountability. 2018 is a special one as it was the first year that I decided not to share my yearly goals: I wanted to test if I can still commit to them even without being too loud. But I guess I’m not that resolute: I discovered that passivity crept up, reactivity became my daily habit, and now I even have a hard time recalling what my 2018 goals were.

Going back to my yearly habits, here are my 2019 goals that I will commit myself to. This year I will only have two, namely:

I will commit atleast 30 hours, 40 at most, every week towards the development of my vision, a 1st world Philippines.

Mainly this will be work directed at Progressia — we are at a stage where growth is evident, ideas are overflowing, and hard work is demanded. Even though Progressia works on a trust-based system, and it works amazingly, I’m dying to see what the effects of having a full-time worker are.

Apart from work items from our backlog, this particular goal may also include things like reading books, studying, networking, etc, as these are things that are important for the long haul.

I have counted the costs. Given that I have been entrusted increasing responsibilties in my dayjob and I have aplenty of passions and things that I want to do, this goal will require me dedication and extra consciousness of my resources, working myself to 70+ hours a week, yet capping myself to the 40 hour ceiling to leave me room for my hobbies and relationships. I’ll also make use of time tracking tools to measure my performance. I’ll also permit myself to offset hours to allow room for flexibility.

And that leaves me to my last goal:

I will aim to delight myself in the Lord daily.

A weird goal this may be (I see no quantitative nor qualitative measurement that I can measure myself against) but this is something that I feel I need to work on: Something that has been running in my mind for weeks if not months.

I will aim to delight myself in the Lord on a daily basis: To enjoy Him to the fullest.

And then maybe He will grant me the desires that He designed my heart for.

And from there everything else.


There it is. These are the two goals that I am setting my eyes on for 2019.
How about you? What are the things that you want to see in 2019? Do you mind sharing your goals for next year?

I think that I had been putting the blame of my recent lack of self-discipline on to Someone.

My new knowledge of God’s sovereignty was music to my ears. Even though the knowledge of it is beyond comforting to my soul, but it also became a reason for me not to take any responsibility over my life.

Yet it is amazing, how cold pitch-black nights can open my eyes that is; Sadness made me realize my foolishness.

Now I am ready to bounce back. I am at the edge of my seat. Now is the time to make up for what is lost and move forward!

Distractions

We live in a generation filled with buzzing, noisy, entertaining distractions. We may be preoccupied with tasks, our schedules filled with meetings, and our mind conquered by short-term goals. We think that we are productive, but at the end of the year, we look back and see the time that we lost.

I learned that there’s a GREAT difference between what is urgent and what is important. Important things are what we should only strive to work on, while urgent things are what must be taken care of. Anything else is a distraction.

Working on important things is the goal; working on urgent things is a responsibility.

But consistently working on what is important is difficult. Partly because it requires more mental effort and force, the disciplining of the mind, and the keeping of strong good habits.

But to be distracted is dangerous.

It is a great boon to learn how to number our days, so that we may hopefully gain a heart of wisdom.

Emotions

Kings fell. Nations crumbled. Wars waged. Families broken. All because of a single thing — the fallen human heart.

Leadership always requires strong control over the heart. To keep emotions in check. To control outbursts. To make sound and wise decisions. To have control over the self.

The heart is deceitful above all things; We should watch over it with all diligence.

Stewardship

With everything that we have, with the relationships that we had been given and will be given, with the range of free will that we have, with the space and time that we are in. With the degree of control that we have — it is stewardship entrusted to us.

It is then our job to take responsibility over it.

Finally, self-discipline is hard — The moment we believe that we have it, we then easily lose it. But it is something that is worth having.

 

PS: Though I try to avoid taking quotes out of context but all of these sprung out from a paragraph that randomly popped out of my head: “Don’t you realize that in a race everyone runs, but only one person gets the prize? So run to win! All athletes are disciplined in their training. They do it to win a prize that will fade away, but we do it for an eternal prize. So I run with purpose in every step. I am not just shadowboxing. I discipline my body like an athlete, training it to do what it should. Otherwise, I fear that after preaching to others I myself might be disqualified.”

Learning To Read

The first time that I read a book from cover to cover was when I was in highschool. Our English teacher assigned us a project of reading a book and then making a review out of it. Being a highschool kid who never had any interest in books, I got myself a random fiction book called “The Twelfth Angel” by Og Mandino. It was a book that told the story of a little American kid who’s into competitive baseball.

And the book taught me the value of “never, never, never, never, never giving up.

A Whole New World

Reading the book was fun and exciting. It was like I was dragged into a whole new world with interesting characters, and where I can think and feel what the characters think and feel at the moment. After two months, I finally finished the book. Man, does it feel good to finish a book from cover to cover! Then my sister showed up. She asked me if she can borrow the book. I agreed. She took the book from me, she read it on her spare time, and then after one week, she was finished.

She finished the book in just a week, while I struggled to complete it in two months.

That was the time when I said to myself, “I have no talent in reading. I hate reading books.

Three Reasons To Read

Everything changed when I got into the later years of my college days. I now consider myself an evangelist of reading. In fact, just last year, I finished reading 41 books within a single year. I’m still a naturally slow reader, but I try to atleast put a portion of my time towards reading.

And here’s why I think you should too. I can probably list tens, or maybe a hundred, but I’m going to give you just three reasons why you should read books:

First, because the world-class guys do it! Mark Zuckerberg, Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Elon Musk, Benjamin Franklin. If I am to name one thing that these guys have in common, it is that they realize the importance of reading. These guys have been reported to be voracious readers and that their reading eventually contributed to their success. If these guys who are already at the top did it, and are still doing it, why aren’t we?

Second, because it’s fun. Books can take you not only to different places, but to different eras and even different worlds as well. Imagine, time travel at the palm of your hands! Who would have thought that I could get to experience being in the Romantic Period of Europe? Or who would have thought that I could learn the childhood years, the aspirations, and the habits of one of the Founding Fathers of America? Books open to you how big the world is.

Third, because it makes you smarter. Studies have shown that reading books improves the following: Concentration skills, creativity, self-awareness, knowledge, empathy, and that’s just to name a few.

Reading As An Investment

The simple act of reading might be one of the best investments that we can make. It improves many aspects of our life, and it improves us as a person and as a society overall.

If you can remember what I just shared earlier, I have no talent in reading. I was born a slow reader. And I just got into reading late into my college years. But I now realize the importance of reading.

And a thing that I also believe is this quote that I found to be true. It’s goes like this:

“A reader lives a thousand lives before he dies. The man who never reads lives only one.”

People have been asking me how I’m doing so much with my finite time: having a full-time day job, a startup at the sidelines, music and songwriting, a fitness goal, a language goal, reading goals, and this blog to run.

To answer this, I have to be blunt upfront. I’m not the best at time management. On the contrary, I always feel that my time management skills suck big time. I often slack and procrastinate. I become too comfortable and overconfident. But looking at my plate right now, I now think, “Maybe my friends are right. Maybe I am juggling too much things compared to the regular dude next door.”

Firstly, we have to be on the same page. I think we have to consider time to be the most valuable resource, much more valuable than money. Once you spend time on something, you can’t get it back. And another thing is, almost every one of us are given the same exact amount of hours every day, which is amazing. Another thing that I also know is this: That my time is not permanent; I am not permanent. I could die the next day, or probably the next hour. But as Paul wrote to the church of Ephesus, I realize that a better way to see this is this: To make the best use of time, because the days are evil.

So now that we’re on the same page, hopefully, I’ll attempt to deconstruct the principles that I believe I have been following.

Here are the four keys to a better time management.

1. Value-based thinking

At this age, we are constantly barraged by an endless storm of information. But we should ask ourselves a question: Are these information presented to us really valuable, or are these just distractions designed to capture our constantly wandering bored mind? Do you remember that hilarious Facebook cat video that you just discovered? How about that wildly upsetting (fake) news you’ve just read? Or that series that has been eating away your days? Or that gossip about the guy next door that you barely even know?

As Stephen Covey suggested in his classic book Seven Habits of Highly Effective People, it helps to begin with the end in mind. Ask yourself this question: “What future do I want?” And if you have already have that end in mind, then ask yourself this second question, “Is this information/activity that I’m going to partake valuable? Is this going to contribute to the future that I want?”

It also helps to learn how to identify value when you see it since different things and activities have different values.

Spend time on the valuable things, and ignore the rest.

2. Invest in yourself

I’ve once read in a book (I forgot which book it was) that described the importance of investing in your self.

Let me illustrate by putting yourself in a different shoe:

Imagine that you are in a competition to take down the most number of trees in a single day. Each competitor is given an axe, and this axe could take down a tree with twelve swings. How would you approach the competition if you want to win at the top? Would you rush hacking down trees with a dozen of swings hoping that you’ll be the fastest? Or would you spend considerable time to sharpen the blade of your axe, just so to make it that trees would fall down the moment you bring down a single swing?

Now, know that you are the axe. You can try to go at life with your current sharpness (skill set, knowledge, experience, etc), or you can spend considerable amount of time to learn, study, and develop your self, considerably delaying gratification for the purpose of future greater rewards.

Investing in yourself does not need to be expensive. You can invest in yourself physically (exercising, having a healthy diet, etc), mentally (reading books, studying, meditating), building skills (hobbies, passions), and spiritually (connecting to The God in the Bible).

3. Distinguish the important and the urgent

One tool that I learned to be really helpful is the Eisenhower Decision Matrix.

Basically it’s a tool (or technique, or system, or whatever you want to call it) designed to filter tasks based on their urgency and their importance. It groups tasks to four quadrants: The Do (important and urgent), The Plan (important but not urgent), The Delegate (not important but urgent), and The Limit (not important and not urgent).

EisenhowerDecisionMatrix11

I will not go in-depth here because explaining this concept has been already been done before thanks to The Art of Manliness.

As what has been quoted, “What is important is seldom urgent and what is urgent is seldom important.

4. Aim High

I guess one reason why I’m juggling multiple things is because of the brutal standards that I set to my self. How can I stay comfortable when in my mind I’m competing against multi-talented world-class entrepreneurs? How can I not take risks when the bar has been set by history-renowned polymath individuals? And how can my heart remain peaceful when it has been called for perfection?

 

I hope we realize that time is a gift. And also, that our time is not permanent.

Our time will eventually come to an end.

So let’s use it well.

 


 

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